Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and traditional Chinese Medicine

April is National IBS month. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), also known as spastic colon or mucus colitis is a painful and often debilitating disease that affects many people and severely impedes their quality of life. Fortunately, Chinese medicine has been documented to effectively treat IBS in a safe and drug-free manner.
IBS is a group of symptoms that can vary in array and severity for each afflicted individual. Symptoms usually involve:

  • abdominal cramping and pain
  • constipation and diarrhea
  • flatulence
  • bloating
  • nausea

It is known that there are direct neuro-chemical links between the brain and the GI system affecting digestive motility. This explains why IBS is often much worse in times of emotional stress.

According to Chinese Medicine, IBS is almost always considered a disharmony between the liver and spleen. The liver is responsible for the smooth flow of substances and emotions through the body. This flow can be easily disrupted by emotional disturbances or stress, causing stagnation of Qi, and ultimately blood. The spleen is responsible for the transformation of food into energy, and can easily be weakened by many lifestyle influences, including overeating, unhealthy food, overwork, stress, fatigue, and lack of exercise. When the spleen becomes deficient and the liver is not flowing smoothly, the two organ systems become imbalanced and IBS can result.

By treating the root disharmony between liver and spleen, TCM can provide tremendous relief to the symptoms of IBS and ultimately bring the body back into balance, allowing for a higher quality of life and a return to a healthy gastrointestinal tract. Practitioners of Chinese medicine may use a variety of modalities to treat IBS, including acupuncture, herbs, dietary therapy, and lifestyle changes.

Anoka Massage & Pain Therapy can help treat your IBS through Chinese Medicine. Schedule with one of our acupuncturists today and get relief!

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Samantha Hayes

Samantha Hayes

Samantha Hayes

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